the passage of time

About the Blog:
'P' is for the passage of time. The passing of events, leisure, findings, realizations, aspects of myself and my attempt at capturing them.

About the Author:
I like to drink tea and listen to public radio, especially npr. I crochet, I love infographics and hate using oxford commas. I've also been characterized as a pizza fiend, and I'm okay with that. I enjoy making things from scratch, especially if it's vegan (or pizza).
Ask me anything

Second Block Realizations

I teach math to two blocks back to back. My second block ends up doing far better than my first for a couple of reasons. 

1. Our students are tiered. My lower ability group is my first block and my higher ability group is my second block.

2. The second block is well-behaved (for the most part). It’s probably because they can grasp the material easier.

3. I’m happier in my second block.

Enthusiasm and positivity make all the difference. Let me elaborate.

I get frustrated when students don’t understand, therefore they feed off of that and get frustrated even more. Ugh, what a viscous cycle. But when the student do get the material, I’m happy. They’re happy. Everyone is happy. It’s tough to maintain positivity, but I gotta work on it. 

1. Linguistic Intelligence: the capacity to use language to express what’s on your mind and to understand other people. Any kind of writer, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person for whom language is an important stock in trade has great linguistic intelligence.

2. Logical/Mathematical Intelligence: the capacity to understand the underlying principles of some kind of causal system, the way a scientist or a logician does; or to manipulate numbers, quantities, and operations, the way a mathematician does.

3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence: the capacity to think in music; to be able to hear patterns, recognize them, and perhaps manipulate them. People who have strong musical intelligence don’t just remember music easily, they can’t get it out of their minds, it’s so omnipresent.

4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence: the capacity to use your whole body or parts of your body (your hands, your fingers, your arms) to solve a problem, make something, or put on some kind of production. The most evident examples are people in athletics or the performing arts, particularly dancing or acting.

5. Spatial Intelligence: the ability to represent the spatial world internally in your mind — the way a sailor or airplane pilot navigates the large spatial world, or the way a chess player or sculptor represents a more circumscribed spatial world. Spatial intelligence can be used in the arts or in the sciences.

6. Naturalist Intelligence: the ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) and sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations). This ability was clearly of value in our evolutionary past as hunters, gatherers, and farmers; it continues to be central in such roles as botanist or chef.

7. Intrapersonal Intelligence: having an understanding of yourself; knowing who you are, what you can do, what you want to do, how you react to things, which things to avoid, and which things to gravitate toward. We are drawn to people who have a good understanding of themselves. They tend to know what they can and can’t do, and to know where to go if they need help.

8. Interpersonal Intelligence: the ability to understand other people. It’s an ability we all need, but is especially important for teachers, clinicians, salespersons, or politicians — anybody who deals with other people.

9. Existential Intelligence: the ability and proclivity to pose (and ponder) questions about life, death, and ultimate realities.

Howard Gardner’s seminal Theory of Multiple Intelligences, originally published in 1983, which revolutionized psychology and education by offering a more dimensional conception of intelligence than the narrow measures traditional standardized tests had long applied. (via divinespirit)

(Source: )

ilovecharts:

This map shows unregistered user edits to Wikipedia articles in real time. Unregistered users account for only about 15% of English language Wikipedia edits, so this only represents a small portion of the total edits being made to Wikipedia. That being said, it is still wicked cool.

futurejournalismproject:

The History of Cuss Words
Salon’s featured excerpt of Melissa Mohr’s Holy Shit: A Brief History of Swearing, provides an in depth look at commonly used swear words of the 18th and 19th centuries.
According to Mohr, a cuss word is defined by its impact:

Along with grammatical flexibility, this figurativeness is the hallmark of a fully obscene word, a word used not as a literal descriptor but to shock, offend, or otherwise carry emotion — a swearword.

Some of the popular curse words and phrases from Mohr’s excerpt include the following: 
“Arse-opener,” “arse-wedge,” “beard-splitter,” ”chinkstopper,” and ”plugtail” were used to describe the act of ”splitting the woman’s anatomy” or “plugging a hole.”
“Bloody” was one of the most popular swear words of the time, but it’s hard to pinpoint its exact origins. It’s assumed that it’s derived from “the adjective bloody as in ‘covered in blood’ or, as the OED proposes, it referred to the habits of aristocratic rabble-rousers at the end of the 17th century, who styled themselves ‘bloods.’”
“Breasts,” “bubbies,” and ”diddeys,” were common words for boobs;  ”bushelbubby” specifically referred to a woman with large breasts. “Tit” didn’t catch on until the early 20th century as a variation of ”teat” which was used in the Middle Ages.
“Bugger” referred to a person giving anal penetration.
“Burning shame” was a term that meant “a lighted candle stuck into the parts of a woman, certainly not intended by nature for a candlestick.” 
“Burnt-Arsed whore” was used during the Renaissance and literally meant “infected with venereal disease.”
“Fartleberry” is the early version of the modern “dingleberry,” which refers to the fecal matter that hangs from hairs around the butt-hole. 
“Gamahuche” meant “mouth on genitals” for both cunnilingus and fellatio. 
“Godemiche” was a word imported from France meaning “dildo.” 
“Larking” could have meant blow job or the act of “having sex with the man’s penis between the woman’s breasts.”
“Lobcock” referred to a large, “dull, inanimate” penis and “pego” was a popular word for dick. 
“Monosyllable,” “quim,” “pussy,” “madge,” and “a woman’s commodity” were all names for vagina. 
“Nackle-ass” was an adjective that meant “poor, mean, inferior, paltry: applied as a term of contempt to both persons and things indifferently.” 
“Rantallion” referred to a scrotum that sags lower than the shaft of a man’s penis.
Slang for sexual intercourse included: “roger,” “screw,” and “have your greens.”
“Tip the velvet” originally meant “french kiss,” but after a hundred years passed, it also referred to the act of preforming cunnilingus. 
“To bagpipe” meant to give a blow job. 
FJP: More bloody fun: Nine Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Swear Words. You should also check out, FUCK — the documentary about “fuck’s” origins and uses. If you don’t — it will surely be a “burning shame.” Figuratively, of course. (Let’s hope.) — Krissy
Image: Screenshot from The Fantastic Mr. Fox.

futurejournalismproject:

The History of Cuss Words

Salon’s featured excerpt of Melissa Mohr’s Holy Shit: A Brief History of Swearing, provides an in depth look at commonly used swear words of the 18th and 19th centuries.

According to Mohr, a cuss word is defined by its impact:

Along with grammatical flexibility, this figurativeness is the hallmark of a fully obscene word, a word used not as a literal descriptor but to shock, offend, or otherwise carry emotion — a swearword.

Some of the popular curse words and phrases from Mohr’s excerpt include the following: 

  • “Arse-opener,” “arse-wedge,” “beard-splitter,” ”chinkstopper,” and ”plugtail” were used to describe the act of ”splitting the woman’s anatomy” or “plugging a hole.”
  • “Bloody” was one of the most popular swear words of the time, but it’s hard to pinpoint its exact origins. It’s assumed that it’s derived from “the adjective bloody as in ‘covered in blood’ or, as the OED proposes, it referred to the habits of aristocratic rabble-rousers at the end of the 17th century, who styled themselves ‘bloods.’”
  • “Breasts,” “bubbies,” and ”diddeys,” were common words for boobs;  ”bushelbubby” specifically referred to a woman with large breasts. “Tit” didn’t catch on until the early 20th century as a variation of ”teat” which was used in the Middle Ages.
  • “Bugger” referred to a person giving anal penetration.
  • “Burning shame” was a term that meant “a lighted candle stuck into the parts of a woman, certainly not intended by nature for a candlestick.” 
  • “Burnt-Arsed whore” was used during the Renaissance and literally meant “infected with venereal disease.”
  • “Fartleberry” is the early version of the modern “dingleberry,” which refers to the fecal matter that hangs from hairs around the butt-hole. 
  • “Gamahuche” meant “mouth on genitals” for both cunnilingus and fellatio. 
  • “Godemiche” was a word imported from France meaning “dildo.” 
  • “Larking” could have meant blow job or the act of “having sex with the man’s penis between the woman’s breasts.”
  • “Lobcock” referred to a large, “dull, inanimate” penis and “pego” was a popular word for dick. 
  • “Monosyllable,” “quim,” “pussy,” “madge,” and “a woman’s commodity” were all names for vagina. 
  • “Nackle-ass” was an adjective that meant “poor, mean, inferior, paltry: applied as a term of contempt to both persons and things indifferently.” 
  • “Rantallion” referred to a scrotum that sags lower than the shaft of a man’s penis.
  • Slang for sexual intercourse included: “roger,” “screw,” and “have your greens.”
  • “Tip the velvet” originally meant “french kiss,” but after a hundred years passed, it also referred to the act of preforming cunnilingus. 
  • “To bagpipe” meant to give a blow job. 

FJP: More bloody fun: Nine Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Swear Words. You should also check out, FUCK — the documentary about “fuck’s” origins and uses. If you don’t — it will surely be a “burning shame.” Figuratively, of course. (Let’s hope.) — Krissy

Image: Screenshot from The Fantastic Mr. Fox.

#vegan gyro (at Foodswings)

at Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)

NYC in five days

hell. yes.

image

NYC (8 more days)

From Dec. 27 til Jan. 5, I’ll be exploring NYC on my own. This is pretty major for me, my first solo trip, especially after years of a sheltered life. Some of my goals are to find myself, meet people and learn.

I’ll have lots of time to myself. Time I can spend thinking about who I am, what I need to prioritize, where I see myself in the coming months. I also want to meet people. Couchsurfing will do just that. In fact, I’ve found hosts!
  • DeMarcus: Dec. 27 - Dec. 30
  • Albert: Dec. 30 - Jan. 2
  • Jake: Jan. 2 - Jan. 5
These guys are lifesavers. I’m also going to some CS meetups, which are perfect. Not only will I meet locals, I’ll also meet travelers — people doing it with the same approach as me. I’m also meeting up with a group to see the ball drop. All of us have never been to NYC during New Year’s, so I’m looking forward to it.
Learning is another important aspect of my trip. Learning about a different lifestyle. Learning about myself, about others, about the history of my country, this city. When I went on field trips in elementary/secondary school, we had to carry a journal, usually. Those experiences trained me well, and I’ll do the same for this trip.
Tentative To Do:
  • MoMA (free on Fridays from 4-8 p.m.)
  • New Museum (free Thursdays 7-9 p.m.)
  • Ground Zero
  • Battery Park
  • Staten Island Ferry/Statue of Liberty
  • Washington Square Park
  • Central Park
  • Wall Street
  • Walk across the Brooklyn Bridge
  • Chinatown
  • Little Italy
  • West Village
  • Lower East Side
  • Chelsea
  • SoHo
  • NYC Public Library

The list will expand and then shorten as I do more research. I know I should leave some room for uncertainty, in case I hear about something else happening, or if my plans get cancelled for some reason. Though planning is important, being flexible is more so. I’m so excited! 

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